Computers

Google’s smart contact lenses: Could have been Microsoft – CNET

Posted: Friday, January 17, 2014

In 2011, Microsoft supported Babak Parviz’s research into chip-enabled contact lenses that could detect diabetes-related high blood sugar levels. (Credit: screenshot by Stephen Shankland/CNET) Google is the only big tech company that’s visionary and disruptive enough to back an idea like the smart contact lenses to help diabetics monitor blood-sugar levels, right? Wrong. Microsoft, that dowdy old has-been (at least in Silicon Valley conventional wisdom), was involved in the very…

Microsoft extends XP anti-malware support until July 2015 – InfoWorld (blog)

Posted: Friday, January 17, 2014

No matter how many times Microsoft tries to put down the XP zombie, it always seems to lurch back to life again. Consider the latest partial about-face from Redmond. Microsoft has elected to end all support for Windows XP on April 8, 2014 — except for updates to Microsoft’s anti-malware products running on XP, which will be available until July 2015. No, that’s not a typo. According to the Microsoft…

Keep the Internet free and open – Los Angeles Times

Posted: Friday, January 17, 2014

How you answer that question will define what role you think federal regulators should play in ensuring that all content, from Netflix programs to Rush Limbaugh podcasts, receives equal treatment by the likes of Comcast and Verizon. The U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia ruled this week that the Federal Communications Commission overreached when it laid down rules preventing network operators from assigning fast and…

‘Pay to play’ on the Web?: Net neutrality explained – CNN

Posted: Friday, January 17, 2014

(CNN) — How would you like to have to pay a fee to be able to stream YouTube videos at full speed? What if you liked downloading music from, say, Last.fm or Soundcloud, but those sites suddenly became infinitely slower than bigger sites like Amazon or iTunes? Those are the kind of major changes to the Internet some folks are envisioning after a federal court ruling this week on what’s…

‘Pay to play’ on the Web?: Net neutrality explained – CNN

Posted: Thursday, January 16, 2014

(CNN) — How would you like to have to pay a fee to be able to stream YouTube videos at full speed? What if you liked downloading music from, say, Last.fm or Soundcloud, but those sites suddenly became infinitely slower than bigger sites like Amazon or iTunes? Those are the kind of major changes to the Internet some folks are envisioning after a federal court ruling this week on what’s…